Invited Scholars

Hassan Arab

Hassan Arab

PhD Student, Wayne State University; Sponsored Graduate Scholar, Kuwait University

Hassan Arab is a second year PhD student at the School of Social Work at Wayne State University. He is currently specialized in policy analysis and planning with a concentration on community organizing and social mobility. He has adverse research interests, but mainly focuseson environmental policies, social work education, welfare policies in Kuwait, and marginalized communities in Kuwait political and social rights. Community organizing has always been a passion as he was one of the founders of the Social Work Society at Kuwait University and the Kuwaiti Student Federation at Wayne State University. He also has an interest in arts as a form of community learning tool and has written and directed a play funded by the Kuwaiti Ministry of Youth that revolves around community polarization, women rights violations, and structural power struggles between society and political actors.

Traci-lee Christianson

Traci-lee Christianson

MA Student, Department of Psychology and Health Studies, University of Saskatchewan

Traci-lee (Traci), she/her, is of white settler ancestry. She received her BA (Honors equivalent) in Applied Psychology from Concordia University of Edmonton in 2019. Subsequently, she worked with women who have experienced intimate partner violence to help them identify, obtain, and maintain meaningful employment. She is now a second-year master’s student studying Applied Social Psychology at the University of Saskatchewan. In addition, she is a research assistant for the Coronavirus Variants Rapid Response Network’s Indigenous Engagement, Development, and Research Pillar 7 (CIEDAR). Traci’s research interests are diverse; however, her research has focused primarily on language and bias.

Juniper Redvers

Juniper Redvers

BSc., MEDes, Research Advisor, Institute for Circumpolar Health Research

Juniper Redvers (she/her) is a member of the Deninu K'ue First Nation, a mom, an academic, Indigenous counselor, and land-based advocate. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Global Resource Systems from the University of British Columbia and a Masters in Environmental Design at the University of Calgary. After growing up in Denendeh Northwest Territories (in what is now known as Canada), she currently lives on Kwanlin Dün First Nation and Ta’an Kwäch’än territory in the Yukon, northern Canada, where she offers supportive Indigenous based counseling for youth and families, curriculum development, facilitation, training and research around various wellness topics including trauma-informed practice, cultural safety, Indigenous resilience, and land-based healing approaches. She is interested in how the fields of ecology, health, and education are interrelated, and aims to integrate across these disciplines for practical application in northern communities.

Amaya Carrasco Torrontegui

Amaya Carrasco Torrontegui

PhD Student, Food Systems Program, Agroecology and Livelihoods Collaborative, & Gund Institute for the Environment, University of Vermont; The Caliata Initiative

Amaya is a PhD student in the Food Systems Program with a Specialization in Agroecology at the University of Vermont. For her dissertation, she is working on two case studies (Ecuador and Bolivia) to understand collective action in the context of agroecological transition. Amaya also has worked for several years with NGOs, grassroots, governments, and academia at the intersection of agroecology, climate change, food justice, and well-being. She has training as a well-being coach and is the Operations Director of the Caliata Initiative, which aims to reimagine the rural sector in the Andes. Amaya collaborated on different research projects and co-authored several articles. For more information, please visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/amaya-carrasco-483410129/ Twitter: AmayaCarrascoT1

Dr. Derek Jennings

Dr. Derek Jennings

Assistant Professor, School of Public Health, University of Washington

Dr. Derek Jennings is a Bezruchka Family Endowed Professor within the UW School of Public Health. As a tribal nations member, he works primarily with Indigenous communities as a health educator, addressing the social determinants of health related to food, diet and improving diet.

Kelsey Timler

Kelsey Timler

Phd Candidate, Interdisciplinary Studies, University of British Columbia

Kelsey Timler is a settler scholar and fourth-year doctoral candidate at the University of British Columbia. She works on a number of Participatory Action Research projects in partnership with currently and formerly incarcerated peoples, with the ultimate goal of supporting the health, wellbeing and dignity of those unjustly burdened by the colonial carceral state. In previous life she was a professional cook for many years, and her doctoral work is focused on co-developing a food justice project with women on parole, seeing food as an entryway to community building, healing, and resurgence. She believes in the power of food to bring people together, the strength of art and storytelling to empower, disrupt, and dream, and the obligation of academic researchers to acknowledge and confront the ongoing harms of extractive research. She is grateful to work alongside a vibrant network experts who’ve survived incarceration, artists and activists, and of Indigenous Elders and teachers. Kelsey lives on the unceded and occupied territories of the Stό:lō Nation in British Columbia, Canada.

Dr. Katherine A. Collins

Dr. Katherine A. Collins

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology and Health Studies, University of Saskatchewan

Katherine (Katie) Anne Collins, PhD, HBSc, is of mixed-race ancestry: her mother is Cree while her father had white Irish ancestry. Katie received her Honours Bachelor of Science from the University of Toronto in 2007 and her Doctorate in Experimental Social Psychology from the University of Ottawa in 2015. She is now an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and Health Studies at the University of Saskatchewan. As a social psychologist, Katie believes it is of vital importance to conduct research that is relevant to, and can inform, socio-cultural issues. In line with this, she is an emerging scholar in the areas of culture, language, and identity. She believes that a strong cultural identity is necessary for individuals and communities to thrive. As Katie knows from her own experience, language is inextricably linked to both culture and identity; it links us to other people, shapes our experience of the world, and defines the way we think about ourselves.

Amber S. Khan

Amber S. Khan

PhD Candidate, Department of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington

Amber Khan is a fourth-year doctoral candidate in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences. Her research is broadly focused on disaster recovery and climate change displacement among marginalized communities, with a specific focus on housing at the moment. She received her MPH in Environmental Epidemiology from University of California Berkeley in 2019.

Hiwot Zewdie

Hiwot Zewdie

PhD Student, Epidemiology, University of Washington

Hiwot Zewdie is a second-year doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology and pre-doctoral trainee on the Biostatistics, Epidemiologic, and Bioinformatic Training in Environmental Health training grant at the University of Washington. She previously received an MSc in Global Health and certificate in Geospatial Analysis from Duke University. Hiwot’s research interests include exploring social and built environment determinants of chronic disease outcomes, particularly in rapidly urbanizing contexts globally.